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Curiosities of ancient Rome (Artifact)

The world of ancient Romans abounded in a number of amazing curiosities and information. The source of knowledge about the life of the Romans are mainly works left to us by ancient writers or discoveries. The Romans left behind a lot of strange information and facts that are sometimes hard to believe.

Roman marble bust of young man

Roman marble bust of a young man. Scientists suspect that it is a funeral portrait, intended to show the deceased in a heroic and dignified manner. The marble from which the object was made, was obtained near Aphrodisias, in ancient Caria (present-day Western Turkey).

Roman marble bust of young man

Mosaic showing an offering

Roman mosaic showing an offering by a couple in a villa on the coast. Object dated to the 4th century CE; found in Ostia. Currently, the artifact can be admired in the Toledo Art Museum (USA).

Mosaic showing an offering

Missile from Roman ballista

A missile from a Roman ballista, found at Leckie Broch (central Scotland). A crack in the stone is clearly visible, which scientists interpret as the result of a sudden change in temperature. Perhaps the stone was heated for the purpose of the attack, and the defending Picts tried to cool it with cold water.

Missile from Roman ballista

Bust of Emperor Tacitus

A bust of the Roman emperor Tacitus, who ruled in 275-276 CE. A Roman was elected heir to the throne – after the death of well-liked Aurelian – at the age of 75.

Bust of Emperor Tacitus

Woman with hairstyle of Vestal Virgin

A contemporary woman with a vestal hairstyle and headdress. Vestal was the priestess of the Roman goddess of the hearth, Vesta. Girls aged 6-10 were selected for service, only those from patrician families whose parents were alive. They promised under oath celibacy and virginity.

Woman with hairstyle of Vestal Virgin

Base for sacrificial bowl

The photo shows the base for the sacrificial bowl (foculus), which had an unfolding mechanism. The object was built in the 2nd century CE in the Roman Empire, and was discovered in one of the Germanic graves in Zakrzów, in south-west Poland. The artifact is located in the National Museum in Warsaw.

Base for sacrificial bowl

Roman bust of man

Roman bust of a man from the 1st century CE. The object is made of bronze; currently in the Cleveland Art Museum (USA).

Roman bust of man

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