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Curiosities of ancient Rome (Monuments)

The world of ancient Romans abounded in a number of amazing curiosities and information. The source of knowledge about the life of the Romans are mainly works left to us by ancient writers or discoveries. The Romans left behind a lot of strange information and facts that are sometimes hard to believe.

Temple of Mithra in Garni

A restored Roman temple with an Ionic-style colonnade can be admired in Garni, east of Yerevan, the capital of Armenia. It is the only building of this type in Armenia and the entire former Soviet Union and the highest of all known Roman temples (1396 m above sea level).

Temple in Garni with adjacent ruins

Via Traiana – Roman road in Egnatia

Roman road Via Traiana. Photo was taken in the ancient city of Egnatia, in the south-east of Italy. The road was created during the reign of Emperor Trajan in 109 CE and was intended to shorten the distance between Brindisi (Brundisium) and Benevento (Beneventum). Strabo reports that the new road made it possible to shorten the distance between the cities by a day.

Via Traiana - Roman road in Egnatia

Monumentum Liviae

Via Appia in Ancient Rome was the main cemetery avenue. There were countless monuments and monumental tombs of the most important Roman families. Among them, there were also mass graves for a less wealthy society.

Reconstruction of Columbarium Livia

Roman Arch in Pula

In Pula (Croatia) there is a well-preserved Roman triumphal arch, which honoured the Sergia family, and especially Lucius Sergius Lepidus – a military tribune in the XXIX Legion who took part in the battle of Actium in 29 BCE. The family of Sergia had an important position in the city.

Roman Arch in Pula

Resti di Villa Romana in Palermo

In the garden of Villa Bonanno, in the centre of Palermo (the capital of Sicily; ancient Panormus), there are remains of a Roman villa (Resti di Villa Romana) or even two – as I have read. Unfortunately, the place is fenced and there is no more information about the place. From behind the fence, you can see well-preserved floor mosaics.

Resti di Villa Romana in Palermo

Roman road in Marsala

In the archaeological park of Lilybaeum (Marsala, western Sicily) there are remains of a Roman road that, as cardo, crossed the city from north to south.

Roman road in Marsala

Roman villa in Marsala

In the northern part of the Lilybaeum Archaeological Park (Marsala, western Sicily) are the remains of a large Roman villa. The building was built on the ruins of older buildings and it is possible that the villa could have been built after the devastating earthquake that struck the region in 365 CE.

Roman villa in Marsala

Temple of Dioscuri in Agrigento

Temple of the Dioscuri (Castor and Pollux) in Agrigento was built in the middle of the 5th century BCE. The preserved four columns prove that they were made in the Doric order. The building had six columns on both sides; of the other two, thirteen.

Temple of Dioscuri in Agrigento

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